Welcome to SixFigureStart®

Career Coaching by Former Fortune 500 Recruiters

The Job Search Is Selling

In my career coaching, I focus a lot on getting my clients to do prospect research and cold calling (networking first of course to get as warm leads as possible.)  The job search depends on selling, much like a business does.  You brand yourself, you target your niche, and you sell to your customers…in this case prospective employers. 

A recent article in CNN Money Small Business about Sam Richter’s “Take The Cold Out Of Cold Calling” gives great tips on how to better research prospects, including how to uncover email addresses and identify mid-level managers.  I haven’t read the full book, but the tips offered in the article are similar to what I’ve used as a recruiter to uncover prospective candidates.  Candidates should be doing the same to uncover job leads.

A common adage in sales is to put yourself in the shoes of the customer.  As a candidate, you need to think like a recruiter and use the tools that they use to ensure that you’re on their radar.  The job search is about selling.  Forget the umpteenth book on resume-writing or interviews.  Learn to sell.

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2 Responses

  1. Sam Richter says:

    Thank you so much for your kind words. In my opinion, the job search is the most important sales call a person will ever go on. What I teach in my book is how to find information on people, companies, and industries and how to use it to ensure relevancy.

    A great way to use information to differnentiate oneself from other candidates is to demonstrate that you have an understanding of what’s going on with a company, and how you can provide value. So for example, let’s say that you’re interviewing for a job in the medical device industry, and your experience is in financial services sales. At face value, you’re not qualified for the job. But if you learn about the company, its competition, and its industry, you’ll probably find areas where your experience is exceptionally relevant. So in the interview, you might be able to say something like: “It’s obvious I don’t have medical device experience on my resume. However, I’m guessing you can teach me your industry in less than six months. In studying your firm, I see that you’re competing against an established firm with 80% market share, selling a very complex product. For the past 20 years, I’ve been selliing an exceptionally complex product and helped take my former company from 2% market share to 38% market share. So you can teach me the medical device industry in six months, but it would take you 25 years to learn what I know in terms of how to get your product in front of the right people, and get them to write checks.

    Okay…it’s 3:00 a.m. my time so hopefully this was coherant. My point is, if you can learn about what the other person cares about, and show relevancy and establish credibility that you can solve their problems, you’re in the upper one-half of one percent of job candidates.

    Yes…I hope you buy my book. However, make sure to also use the Warm Call Center and download the Warm Call toolbar, both of which are free. Just go to my Web site at http://www.takethecold.com and click the Warm Call Center tab on the upper navigation. In the Center you’ll find my favorite Web sites related to finding information on people, companies, and industries plus a whole slew of other helpful search resources.

    Thanks again for your kind words. Good luck and anyone, please let me know how I can help you.

    sam richter

  2. Rui Heh says:

    I totally agree with Sam. And thanks for the info

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