Welcome to SixFigureStart®

Career Coaching by Former Fortune 500 Recruiters

SixFigureStart Headlines Breakfast and Networking Fundraiser in Conde Nast Café Jan 6

For Association of Community Employment Programs for the Homeless (A.C.E.) A.C.E. is a NYC-based charity that enables recovering homeless men and women re-enter the workforce and attain long-term economic self-sufficiency.

Jan 6 8:30a-10:30a 

http://events.linkedin.com/Womens-Roundtable-Charity-Breakfast/pub/190292

Anyone can attend. Send requests to gstern@signatureny.com for more information.

Sponsored by Signature Bank, McGladrey & Pullen, CPAs, Sankel, Surman & McCartin, LLP and Nonpareil Type

Filed under: Company news, , , , , , , , , ,

SixFigureStart Advice in Young Lawyers Connect E-Newsletter

Successful job searches often turn on small details – the confidence in your hand shake, the banter at a networking event, the typo that sinks a resume. The best candidates dot the i’s and cross the t’s in everything they do. Here are examples of small adjustments you can make to take your job search to the next level:

Read the rest of Small Adjustments That Yield Big Dividends by SixFigureStart co-founder Caroline Ceniza-Levine in the Young Lawyers Connect E-Newsletter, published by the NYC Bar:  http://www.nycbar.org/YLC/YLCdec_jan10.pdf

 

Filed under: career coaching, resource recommendation, , ,

“What Do You Think Of Facial Hair?” (aka Are You Sweating The Right Details?)

Okay, that question did not come from the Glass Hammer demographic [the women in finance blog for which I originally wrote this post]….It came from a male audience member in a recent panel that focused on Big Career Mistakes. But now that I have your attention, I wanted to highlight a few points to ponder inspired by the above question that do relate to [all]  readers:

When you have the opportunity to get feedback, ask big questions. The panel was for senior executives and featured former recruiters and executive coaches from a variety of backgrounds. This was a golden opportunity for participants to get candid insight into job search and career planning. This participant was clearly torn about whether his moustache was sabotaging his career, but I recommend focusing on the bigger picture items.

Read the rest of my advice on my latest post for TheGlassHammer.com

http://www.theglasshammer.com/news/2009/12/23/ask-a-career-coach-what-do-you-think-of-facial-hair/

Filed under: career coaching, life coaching, resource recommendation, , , ,

SixFigureStart in CBS Moneywatch: 5 New Rules of Job Security

don’t simply assume your boss is well-informed enough to keep you ahead of the downsizing curve. Take the time to actually read those internal emails, and set up Google alerts on your own company so you don’t miss any news of new initiatives that could affect your job, advises Caroline Ceniza-Levine, co-founder of SixFigureStart, a career coaching and consulting firm.

Read Elaine Pofeldt’s full article here with more tips from me and others:

http://moneywatch.bnet.com/career-advice/article/job-security-5-new-rules-to-get-your-next-job-or-keep-your-current-one/376870/

Filed under: career coaching, resource recommendation, , , , , ,

A Bullet-Proof Holiday Vest for the Unemployed

Whether you just headed past Hannakah, are crashing into Christmas, or coasting to Kwanzaa, here are some ways you can make it through cheerfully even if you are still unemployed.   And make no mistake about it – you must be cheerful/positive because this is prime networking season.  It is a universal truth that positive attracts and negativity repels.  And this is no time to be repelling people away from you because your network can and probably will lead you to a job eventually.  So you must ACT like you are happy, even if you are not.  Here are five ways to do so:

1. Go to the gym for an hour long workout:  get those endorphins pumping through your system because they do help and you will feel healthier and eventually happier!

2. Volunteer:  help someone that is worse off than you are.  It gives a much needed perspective. 

3.  Unclutter your house:  getting rid of the clutter energizes you – even if it’s a coat closet, or a pile of paper that needs to be cleaned up.  The benefits are amazing and it will get addictive!

4. Start your day in a positive way:  listen to uplifting music, read something motivational (I love  Dr Wayne Dyer), garden, or play with your pet.  Playing with animals is so uplifting because they love you unconditionally and they don’t have any worries … so it’s liberating.

5. Pray to a higher power – when things are too overwhelming, give it up to your higher power – you may find that it relieves an huge amount of stress.

So happy holidays to you because there is no reason for them not to be happy.  You will find a position – it’s just a matter of time.  So go in peace, and network with gusto!

Filed under: career coaching

Gratitude As A Career Management Tool

Here’s why gratitude works not just around the holiday table but for your career as well:

Gratitude puts you in a spirit of plenty – of having, instead of lacking.  This leads to confidence, energy and a position of strength that is attractive to the people around you, whether it’s prospective employers or senior management looking for whom to tap for leadership.

Gratitude focuses you on what is working in your life.  Similarly, for good career management and job search, you want to focus on what is working and repeat what works and expand this to other areas.  You don’t want to spend all of your energy troubleshooting problems.  Of course you need to pay attention and fix any strategies or behaviors that aren’t getting the results you desire.  But more importantly focus on what works well and do more.

Gratitude provides the foundation from which you can take risks.  Once you realize all the great things you have accomplished and the strengths that you do have, you have confidence, you have patterns to follow, and you have a base off of which you can try new things.  You can afford to be bold – you’ve achieved so much already.  In this way, gratitude coats you in Teflon, and problems roll off of you more easily.  Try a gratitude journal for a few days or weeks if you can, and see the benefits of gratitude as a career management tool.

This article may be reposted as long as this byline is included in its entirety:  Caroline Ceniza-Levine is a career expert, writer, speaker and co-founder of SixFigureStart (www.sixfigurestart.com), a career coaching firm comprised of former Fortune 500 recruiters.  Caroline is a co-author (along with Donald Trump, Jack Canfield and others) of the upcoming “How the Fierce Handle Fear: Secrets to Succeeding in Challenging Times” due out March 2010; Bascom Hill Books.  Formerly in corporate HR and retained search, Caroline most recently headed University Relations for Time Inc and has also recruited for Accenture, Citibank, Disney ABC, and others.  Caroline is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Professional Development at Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs, a life coach (www.thinkasinc.com) and a columnist for CNBC.com, Conde Nast’s Portfolio.com, Vault.com, Wetfeet.com and TheGlassHammer.com.

Filed under: career coaching, life coaching, Uncategorized, , , ,

Career Check-up For 2010

Many New Year resolutions will revolve around career. Here are some questions to answer so you can get a running start into 2010:

What career strategy is right for me for now? If you are unemployed, do you want to be an employee or entrepreneur? If you have a job and are happy, how can you expand on what you like? If you are unhappy, do you need a change of company, industry, function or all of the above?

What commitments can I make now before I get too busy? Are there professional development workshops I can register for AND schedule into my calendar now? Are there networking groups I can join in time for the holiday mixer AND whose regular meetings I can schedule into my calendar now? Are there colleagues past and present I can schedule lunch with for the first weeks of 2010?

What do I want and need to accomplish 30 days, 90 days, 180 days, 365 days from now? When interviewing for a job, good candidates ask this question to understand what is expected of them and to have an outline of where to focus in the short-term. If you are a company veteran, look at your role with fresh eyes and plot out your next 30, 90, 180 and 365 days. Be deliberate about where you are spending your time and energy in 2010. Set a calendar reminder for those same time periods to update your resume or block off some time for self-reflection and to reorient your plans if needed.

What do I need outside of my career to be successful? A strong personal foundation supports professional success. While you focus on professional development, networking and career strategy, don’t forget to include time for relationships, self-care, fun and relaxation, community involvement – whatever you need to be at your personal and therefore professional best.

This article may be reposted as long as this byline is included in its entirety:  Caroline Ceniza-Levine is a career expert, writer, speaker and co-founder of SixFigureStart (www.sixfigurestart.com), a career coaching firm comprised of former Fortune 500 recruiters.  Caroline is a co-author (along with Donald Trump, Jack Canfield and others) of the upcoming “How the Fierce Handle Fear: Secrets to Succeeding in Challenging Times” due out March 2010; Bascom Hill Books.  Formerly in corporate HR and retained search, Caroline most recently headed University Relations for Time Inc and has also recruited for Accenture, Citibank, Disney ABC, and others.  Caroline is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Professional Development at Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs, a life coach (www.thinkasinc.com) and a columnist for CNBC.com, Conde Nast’s Portfolio.com, Vault.com, Wetfeet.com and TheGlassHammer.com.

Filed under: career coaching, , ,

Book Review: Harvey Mackay’s Dig Your Well Before You’re Thirsty

I finally read Harvey Mackay’s Dig Your Well Before You’re Thirsty, after hearing it mentioned multiple times as the networking bible.  I can see why people feel this way — originally published in 1997, much of its advice is timeless.  It is a good, speedy review of good networking ideas and practices.  I especially liked the chapter where Mackay emphasized that personal and professional networks are separate.  He did say you might have overlap but you can’t assume that.  It was nice to see him set some boundaries, given how aggressive some of the other advice was.

In fact, the constant networking push might be too much for some (if not many) readers.  But this is a networking book so his all-networking-all-the-time approach is not unexpected.  He encourages readers out of their comfort zone — to try email if you’re a live networker, to approach different ages/ races/ backgrounds — and this is a good example of how Mackay pushes.

All in all, it’s a great review of networking concepts.  There isn’t much new here, though it was perhaps new at the time, and it makes a good refresher or reference text for those who are committed to making networking an integral part of your life.

Filed under: book review, , , ,

Reflections On 2009

As we barrel into next year – preparing for the holiday season, tying up projects at work, thinking about next year’s resolutions – it is easy to diminish the significance of the current year. But there are insights to be gained upon reflection on 2009:

What milestones occurred in 2009? This is a good time to audit where you are in your search – are you getting meetings with people who are in a position to hire you or help you? For the employed, update your resume – are you growing, with new items to share?

What are you particular grateful for in 2009? Much of job search and career management seems to focus on fixing what is wrong (with the market, with your search). But staying upbeat is key to a productive search and career, and gratitude is a great way to stay upbeat.

What will you remember most about 2009? So much of good job search and career management is having examples of your big achievements – what are they for 2009?

What did you learn in 2009? Good career planning always includes R&D investment in yourself.

What was your favorite movie/ book/ show from 2009? You need a life outside of your job search and career.

Who shared your life in 2009? You need a support systems of friends, family and community.

What was the funniest thing that happened in 2009? In addition to gratitude, laughter is a great way to stay upbeat.

What is most special about 2009? So much of job search and career management is pushing for the next win. But don’t forget to cherish the wins along the way.

What is most special about today? It’s not just about next year or even tomorrow. Enjoy right now.

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, career coach, writer, speaker, Gen Y expert and co-founder of SixFigureStart™ (www.sixfigurestart.com), coaches jobseekers using a recruiter’s perspective of what employers really want and how the hiring process really works. Formerly in corporate HR and retained search, Caroline has recruited for Accenture, Citibank, Disney ABC, Time Inc and others. Caroline is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Professional Development at Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs and a life coach (www.thinkasinc.com).

Filed under: career coaching, life coaching, , , , , ,

Book Review: Your Brain At Work by David Rock

Your Brain At Work by David Rock is a great read, though be forewarned it toggles between being a breezy story and a data-intensive read on brain science.  Rock follows two fictional characters on a typical day at work and gives concrete examples of how the brain works (or doesn’t work!) through the typical challenges and stresses.  Email overwhelm, sticky client situations, multi-tasking, even getting lost to an offsite meeting are some of the scenarios.  The examples are relatable, and the advice is on point.

I especially loved Rock’s analogy of the brain as a stage with thoughts as the actors and your self-awareness/ self-mastery as the Director in charge.  It was very helpful to have such a tangible way to think of the jumble of thoughts and memories and emotions that move in and out of your head.  Another helpful paradigm is his classification of goals as toward goals or away goals (e.g., be fit is a toward goal but lose weight is an away goal).  Rock advises us to pick toward goals, thus training our brain on positives, solutions and actionable items.  It’s stuff I’ve heard elsewhere but Rock provides a good context within which to act on these ideas.

I highly recommend this book.  It was recommended to me by friend, fellow coach, and former improv classmate Paul McGinniss (http://response-ableconsulting.com/).  Thanks, Paul!  Hope to do improv with you again soon.

Filed under: book review, career coaching, , , , ,

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.